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KHALEEJ TIMES – Dr Prathap C. Reddy: Human life is priceless

Dr Prathap C. Reddy, Chairman, Apollo Hospitals Group, talks about his mission to provide healthcare for every individual in an exclusive interview with Khaleej Times

 

Dr Prathap C. Reddy left a flourishing medical practice in Boston and returned to India in 1971, uprooting his young family at the same time. This was a son’s decision in response to his father’s request. Almost a decade later, in 1983, he set up his first hospital in Chennai, inaugurated by the then president of India, Giani Zail Singh. This was the start of what was to become India’s first integrated corporate hospital chain.

“It was in 1983 that I helplessly watched a young man lose his life to cardiac complications. If only we had the necessary technology and infrastructure at that time, we could have saved his precious life and ensured his recovery,” recollects Dr Reddy in an e-mail interview with Khaleej Times. “Human life is priceless, and it was after that tragic incident that I decided to start a hospital in India that would give people access to international standard healthcare at an affordable rate. We are committed to the achievement and maintenance of excellence in education, research and healthcare for the benefit of humanity,” he adds.

Elaborating on the services offered, the doctor says, “I think we can confidently say that we are a complete eco-system of healthcare delivery, providing almost all healthcare services. We have the distinction of having the busiest Solid Organ Transplant programme, which is testimony to our expertise in transplant procedures.”

Dr Reddy notes, “We’ve also performed some of the world’s first surgeries like the first-ever separation of Pygopagus twins (two bodies joined at the pelvis), highlighting our expertise in paediatric and critical care. Having successfully conducted over 500 robotic surgeries in the fiscal year 2014, we are also one of the leading players in robotic surgery. We have a research foundation with a focus on global clinical trials, epidemiological studies, stem cell and genetic research.”

What sets Apollo apart from others in the field? Dr Reddy replies, “Our focus on clinical excellence, a unique team of medical experts and state-of-the-art infrastructure and technology have helped deliver the best success rates, giving us an edge over others. I am glad that, over the years, we have grown as a brand synonymous with excellence, which is what we believe is our differentiating factor.”

According to Dr Reddy, it is unfortunate and quite unsettling to witness the rising number of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and related diseases across the world — especially in developing countries. “What’s more disturbing is the fact that youngsters who are the leaders of tomorrow are also prone to these disorders. While there is the expertise and technology to treat NCDs after its onset, there is still carelessness associated with general health and well-being, which can only be tackled by a social movement,” he stresses.

NCDs, which are generally slow progressing diseases, are expected to cost the global economy nearly $47 trillion by 2030, which is alarming. According to an analysis of global data, for every 10 per cent rise in chronic illnesses, the country loses 0.5 per cent of GDP growth, proving that an individual’s health not only impacts the person, but the nation as a whole.

“There has to be a social revolution that will encourage people to make a conscious decision to take care of themselves and undergo regular health checks that can help prevent diseases — and not treat them as a last resort,” he notes.

Speaking about the prevalence of heart disease and its correlation to modern lifestyle, the doctor stresses, “Whether it is the UAE, India or any other part of the world, sedentary lifestyles, lack of physical exercises, unhealthy diets and a callous attitude about one’s health are the main reasons for heart disease. The bitter-sweet truth is that while we have made tremendous progress in developing technologies and devices to make our lives easier, these advancements have made us physically sluggish and inactive. Private and public organisations must come together to increase awareness about healthy living and spread the message that human life is priceless.”

Dr Reddy also talks about why treatment in India is better and cost-
effective in comparison. “We believe it’s the 3C approach that attracts international patients — care, clinical excellence and affordable cost. 
Patients are aware that hospitals like Apollo give paramount importance to quality of services and delivery offered, which are on par with our international counterparts. Additionally, JCI-International accreditations and re-accreditations becoming a regular factor is another boost to medical tourism in India. The government has also been encouraging on this front. They recently relaxed visa norms for SAARC (South Asian Association for Regional Co-operation) patients, which is a welcome move for medical tourism in India.”

Last year, the UAE’s Emirates airline too teamed up with Apollo Hospitals to connect international patients with quality healthcare services in India. Dr Reddy says, “As part of this tie-up, patients and their attendants from 19 countries across the Middle East and Africa can come to our hospital’s flagship locations in Chennai, Hyderabad, New Delhi, Kolkata, Ahmedabad and Bangalore to avail specially formulated fares for round-trip flights on Emirates. Under this partnership, travellers coming to Apollo Hospitals can avail special fares through the ticket booking section of the Emirates airline microsite using the passcode, which is mentioned within the site. (Customers can log-in to www.emirates.com/in/Apollo to avail the customised fares).

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Link: https://www.khaleejtimes.com/article/20150306/ARTICLE/303069990/1002 

Everything you need to know about the presidential debate

A group advocating the rights of veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan are on the Hill this week to press lawmakers on issues ranging from disability care to high rates of unemployment.

Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, the largest organization for veterans of the wars, will host a series of events as a part of their Storm the Hill campaign this week, culminating in Thursday’s release of their legislative agenda for 2010.

Top priorities include improving the claims processing system for disabled veterans, addressing the suicide epidemic among service members and improving the Veterans Affairs Department’s health care services for women.

This is the fifth annual trip for the group, which was founded in 2004. Starting Monday, the veterans will form teams named for the military alphabet — Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, etc. — and will meet with more than 100 lawmakers to discuss their issues.

The veterans were originally scheduled to meet with Rep. John Murtha (D-Pa.), a Marine veteran of the Vietnam War, who died Monday.

Presidential Elections 2016

This year, in this election, we are called to reaffirm our values and our commitments, to hold them against a hard reality and see how we are measuring up, to the legacy of our forbearers, and the promise of future generations. I can no more disown him than I can my white grandmother – a woman who helped raise me, a woman who sacrificed again and again for me, a woman who loves me as much as she loves anything in this world, but a woman who once confessed her fear of black men who passed by her on the street, and who on more than one occasion has uttered racial or ethnic stereotypes that made me cringe. But my personal story is not so unique. That is in Israel’s interest, Palestine’s interest, America’s interest, and the world’s interest. That commitment is at the core of the Treaty, and it must be kept for all who fully abide by it.

Again and again, we’ve seen him make tough choices when easier ones were available. But the truth is, that isn’t all that I know of the man. I get it.

But they sense, deep in their bones, that with just a slight change in priorities, we can make sure that every child in America has a decent shot at life, and that the doors of opportunity remain open to all. We would be making the same mistake that Reverend Wright made in his offending sermons about America – to simplify and stereotype and amplify the negative to the point that it distorts reality. Let us be our brother’s keeper, Scripture tells us. I will rebuild our military to meet future conflicts. Over seven years ago, the United States pursued al Qaeda and the Taliban with broad international support. The Internet and television can bring knowledge and information, but also offensive sexuality and mindless violence.

More of you have lost your homes and even more are watching your home values plummet. I know there are differences on same-sex marriage, but surely we can agree that our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters deserve to visit the person they love in the hospital and to live lives free of discrimination. The men and women who gathered there could’ve heard many things. Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. I know there has been controversy about the promotion of democracy in recent years, and much of this controversy is connected to the war in Iraq.

Did I ever hear him make remarks that could be considered controversial while I sat in church? Yes. When a new flu infects one human being, all are at risk.

We worship an awesome God in the Blue States, and we don’t like federal agents poking around in our libraries in the Red States. I submitted myself to His will, and dedicated myself to discovering His truth and carrying out His works. I know there are differences on same-sex marriage, but surely we can agree that our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters deserve to visit the person they love in the hospital and to live lives free of discrimination. We see it in the history of Andalusia and Cordoba during the Inquisition.

Senate confirms judicial nominees

The Senate unanimously confirmed four of 38 pending judicial nominations Thursday evening, the first of President Barack Obama’s judicial nominees to be approved since September.

The nominees—Catherine Eagles, Kimberly Mueller, John Gibney, and James Bredar—are the longest delayed district court nominees, who were each reported out of the Judiciary Committee unanimously. The nominations for Eagles, Mueller and Gibney were sent to the full Senate in May and Bredar was reported out of the committee in June.

The White House hailed the confirmations but said the Senate must continue to act.

“We’re pleased that these four nominees have been confirmed, but urge the Senate to take action on the 34 nominees who remain on the calendar – particularly the 19 who would fill judicial emergencies,” said spokesman Josh Earnest.

Regan Lachapelle, a spokesperson for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said that the four confirmations Thursday are “just a start” to clearing the backlog during this session.

“We are still working through the list and are committed to confirming as many judges as we can,” said Lachapelle. “We’ll take them when we can get them.”

This week, Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell have negotiated a deal that could potentially break the bottleneck of Obama’s “uncontroversial” federal court nominees during the dwindling lame duck legislative session. These included most of the nominees who had been reported out of the Judiciary Committee by unanimous votes before November elections.

Still, there are a handful of circuit court nominees — whose nominations are rarer and typically receive greater scrutiny — still waiting for votes on the Senate floor, though they had been nominated as far back as November 2009.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy praised the confirmations and called on more to be confirmed to address districts facing judicial emergencies, including vacancies and backlogged dockets, across the country.

“These confirmations are long overdue,” Leahy said. “For months, these nominations have languished before the Senate, without explanation and for no reason. I hope these are the first of many confirmations by the Senate before we adjourn.”

GOP lawmakers have flagged three other nominees, including California law professor Goodwin Liu, as too liberal and inexperienced to be parceled with the rest of the non-controversial judicial candidates set for Senate confirmation.

“We’re pleased that these four nominees have been confirmed, but urge the Senate to take action on the 34 nominees who remain on the calendar – particularly the 19 who would fill judicial emergencies.”

Cutting Risk by Disclosing Political Donations

In politics, it often pays to be ahead of the curve. That holds true for corporate governance too, even more so when politics enter the equation.

That is why a small number of the nation’s largest corporations have voluntarily agreed to report their share of trade association outlays that go to fund political activities. Together, these firms encompass a virtual who’s who in the microcosm of corporate America. In doing so, this corporate vanguard has yielded to pressure from shareholder activist groups that targeted them as prime candidates for greater accountability and transparency.

But this trend also reflects the altered political climate in Washington — a climate personified by Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., the liberal chairman of the House Financial Services Committee and an advocate of what he calls “shareholder democracy.”

“Some companies get it, some don’t,” said Bruce Freed, co-director of the Washington-based Center for Political Accountability, a nonprofit and non-partisan shareholder advocacy group that is playing a key behind-the-scenes role in orchestrating the recent run of voluntary disclosures. “The ones that don’t get it,” he added, “are headed for a (shareholder) proxy vote.”

Veterans’ advocates hit the Hill

A group advocating the rights of veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan are on the Hill this week to press lawmakers on issues ranging from disability care to high rates of unemployment.

Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, the largest organization for veterans of the wars, will host a series of events as a part of their Storm the Hill campaign this week, culminating in Thursday’s release of their legislative agenda for 2010.

Top priorities include improving the claims processing system for disabled veterans, addressing the suicide epidemic among service members and improving the Veterans Affairs Department’s health care services for women.

This is the fifth annual trip for the group, which was founded in 2004. Starting Monday, the veterans will form teams named for the military alphabet — Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, etc. — and will meet with more than 100 lawmakers to discuss their issues.

The veterans were originally scheduled to meet with Rep. John Murtha (D-Pa.), a Marine veteran of the Vietnam War, who died Monday.

Dusk to Dawn, Chennai’s First Night Marathon organized by The Centre for Liver Disease and Transplantation, Apollo Hospitals was a great success!

Date: 12 Dec 2014

Each one of us has the power to renew lives by pledging to donate organs, and it is this very noble thought which was the starting-point for the ‘Dusk to Dawn Chennai Marathon 2014’.

The ‘Dusk to Dawn Chennai Marathon 2014’ was held on Saturday, 22nd November 2014, a first of its kind night marathon hosted in the city of Chennai by The Centre for Liver Disease & Transplantation. It is an initiative to create awareness among people about liver diseases, liver wellness and Organ Donation. Over 6300 people joined hands at the Island Grounds on 22nd November 2014 and over 1000 Apollo Family members too participated in the marathon. The oldest participant was a 73 year old man and the youngest participant was a 5 year old girl child, who ran 3 Km each. A special 1.5 km run for transplant recipients was also organized to celebrate their Second Chance to Live.

Dusk to Dawn
Dusk to Dawn
Dusk to Dawn